The Cardinal Rules of Buying Collector Cars: 5 Keys to Success

When it comes to the art of classic car collecting, getting your foot in the door can be tricky if you’re unsure where to start. While there is no hard and fast rule for each person to follow, fresh-faced curators should conduct thorough research and chat with fellow collectors to avoid regret-filled investments. Whether you’re in the market for a Jaguar E-Type, Ferrari 250 GTO, or a Porsche 924, familiarizing yourself with the ins and outs of the vintage car industry is vital.

If you’re ready to dive into vintage automobile ownership, read on for five fundamental rules that will help you score your dream car and have you cruising down the highway in no time.

Opt for covered car transport

While pinning down the perfect vintage model is the most critical piece of the investment puzzle, you also need to have a plan in place to transport your prized possession once you seal the deal.  While it may be tempting to skimp on shipping costs by opting for an open carrier, you should consider selecting the enclosed option to protect your car from damage. Ultimately, by choosing a provider with covered car transport options, your vintage vehicle will be safe from flying rocks, road debris, and unpredictable weather.

Join a collector club

One way to guarantee expert advice when conducting classic car research is by joining a vintage automobile club and picking the brain of life-long collectors. In addition to groups that can walk you through auction culture and dealers in your area, you can seek out vehicle-specific organizations that can answer questions about your unique dream car. By calling upon long-time classic car enthusiasts, you gain first-hand knowledge and insight that will help you as you begin your collection.

Purchase a car that fits your lifestyle

While the exterior aesthetic of your dream vehicle is an important consideration when searching for the perfect model, you also need to select a car that fits your lifestyle. If you’re planning on taking your show-stopping vehicle out for a cruise around town, you’ll want a reliable setup that can withstand the ride. However, if you’re simply planning on showing off your hot rod at classic car shows, you may be able to get away with older, riskier models. Regardless of your intentions, make sure you test the waters by checking out multiple cars before jumping into a purchase.  

Buyer vs. auction

After you’ve settled on the perfect car model, you’ll need to decide whether you want to purchase from a reputable buyer or dive into the world of classic car auctions. For those who wish to examine the vehicle thoroughly, bringing in an outside inspector to verify authenticity, independent dealers are the route to take. On the other hand, if you want the experience of attending a vintage vehicle auction, bonding with like-minded car enthusiasts, it may be time to hit up a local or out-of-state automobile convention. 

Prepare to spend a pretty penny

Regardless of whether you opt for a run-down fixer-upper or a prepped-and-primed vehicle, be ready to drop a pretty penny on your investment. The classic car industry requires time and money to scout out and purchase rare cars, invest in vintage parts, and maintain the vehicle’s integrity. Before you begin your collection, make sure you’re ready to fork out the necessary funds to upkeep a potentially expensive hobby. 

Wrapping up

Purchasing a rare, vintage vehicle requires you to research thoroughly, compare models, and connect with trusted classic car enthusiasts to land the ride of your dreams. So be prepared to invest your time and money into your new hobby, and you’ll be flaunting your curated show-stopping collection in no time.

 

Guest post by Melissa Gonzalez

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